Ross Guffei

WHAT I BELIEVE IN

Ross GUFFEI

St. Albert City Council

With my education, training, and experience, I can assist in resolving the traffic issues on St. Albert Trail and other major arterials throughout the Community I believe it is not the technology that is the issue with the traffic light congestion, it is the desire to coordinate signal lights that are lacking I have the desire (and the knowledge) to make the lights facilitate the efficient movement of traffic instead of stopping at every signal light.

There are many projects in St. Albert that were never approved by Council.  Administration requests budgets gets Council’s approval for the budget without fully explaining the purpose of the funds Examples of this include the “bump-outs” constructed by using funds from 3 different budgets.  Council was never aware that the funds were being used to build the “bump-outs”.  The multi-year construction project on north St. Albert Trail is another example of a lack of transparency.  The administration requested budgetary funds to add one lane to alleviate traffic.   When I requested the administration to clarify what was being built on St. Albert Trail, the official response was that the City of St. Albert was building 1 new lane and realigning 2 existing lanes When I requested clarification of what the Council had approved for this project from the Mayor’s office, there was no response from the mayor Instead, Administration responded by demanding an explanation for contacting the Mayor’s office after they claimed they had already answered my inquiry It appears that the actual project consists of the construction of 3 new lanes and the removal of two perfectly good lanes A further clarification provided on this project indicated that the construction of the new lane and the realignment of the two existing lanes was intended to accommodate the future LRT The respondent acknowledged that the LRT has not been approved and may never get approved We need more transparency and accountability regarding the construction of these types of projects.

Ross GUFFEI

St. Albert City Council

Ross GUFFEI

St. Albert City Council

St. Albert has the policy to achieve a minimum density of 40 residential units per hectare for all new development.  This density translates into townhouse development as a minimum housing style in all new areas. Single-family homes which are currently the predominant housing type in St. Albert can only be built if there are higher density developments such as apartments to average up the density to a minimum of 40 units per hectare.  St. Albert I grew up to cherish does not consist of ROW on ROW of townhouses with no single-family homes anywhere in sight.

Proposals like the Solar Farm or the Municipal Energy Corporation (MEC) should not be approved without full transparency and accountability.  The justification for these initiatives is revenue generation to offset future tax increases. However, there has not been enough information provided to confirm the validity of this claim.  The current Council wants to borrow $33,000,000 for the Solar Farm and an additional $100,000,000 for the MEC.  This risk to the taxpayer is unacceptable.  I believe that St. Albert doesn’t have a revenue problem. We have a spending problem. There are many Examples that lead one to this conclusion.  These include this year’s redesign and construction of Peron Street (this is the 3rd change in Peron Street in recent history), topping roads with micro surfacing that extends the roads’ life by 5 years, then resurfacing the road with new asphalt two years later (Oakridge Drive South), adding 1 new lane to St. Albert Trail north and realigning 2 existing lanes to accommodate the future LRT that may never be built, and building traffic circles that were never approved by Council.  

As a Councilor, I intend to respect the opinions of the residents of St. Albert.  If the residents vote “no” to a new library, Council should have found a solution that respected that vote. If the survey to lower speed limits resulted in a “no” response, Council should have respected that result and not changed the speed limits.  If residents are opposed to high-density development within existing built-up neighborhoods, then Council should honor that expectation.  Many of the developments recently in St. Albert including “bump-outs”, traffic circles, reduced speed limits within residential areas, and high-density developments are policies that originated in Edmonton.  St. Albert is not Edmonton, and we should not try to be like Edmonton.  Some of these developments were never approved by St. Albert City Council.  The “bump-outs” and traffic circles were implemented by the administration without Council’s knowledge.

As the original designer of Erin Ridge, I am aware of the reasons for the traffic problems in that community.  Most of the traffic in Erin Ridge is not local traffic, but rather drive-through traffic originating in Oakmont and Sturgeon County.  The drive-through traffic is using the residential Erin Ridge streets as a shortcut to the commercial district on the north end of St. Albert Trail.  If the congestion on St. Albert Trail and Boudreau is resolved and with a few changes in Erin Ridge, the only traffic in that neighborhood will be local traffic.  The solution I am contemplating will also resolve the traffic issues in Erin Ridge North.  If the drive-through traffic is eliminated, there will not be a need to build a large traffic circle at the intersection of Ebony and Everitt Drive North.

Ross GUFFEI

St. Albert City Council